Jun 7, 2012

Hoarder

As an artist, one develops strange habits and hobbies. About 25 years ago for some unknown reason I started to collect tomato cans. I thought the artwork on them was beautiful. My collection started to grow at an alarming rate. Each one had to be different and unique. As I traveled the world, I would scour supermarkets and specialty stores seeing what their imported tomato cans were like. Over time it has grown to hundreds. They are all empty because I used the tomatoes for sauce. Also over time the cans would explode from the gas inside. Plus my collection would be too heavy. About 6 years ago before Yun and I moved to Brooklyn, I had build a huge frame that they were displayed in. It was an incredible piece of art. Since Brooklyn, they have put put away in boxes. In that period the collection has grown quite a bit. At some point I need to drag them out and build the ultimate frame to display them in. It will blow people's mind. Especially my own.

8 comments:

tutto a posto said...

First, I am confused. Didn't you always use color in your drawings, both colored pencil and watercolor?

Second, next time--if you like onion--instead of discarding it, eat it. My husband does the same thing along with large pieces of carrots and those cooked veggies are the best with all of the flavor of the sauce!

Moish said...

Awesome!
I like the idea of collecting otherwise ordinary items for the collection/beauty aspect, as opposed to costly antique type of collections.

J.Espadaneira said...

I just keep one single can of olives, I don´t want to get hooked on it. If you want to give it a try begin with the spanish and portuguese ones... but go easy, its adictive!

kane said...

That's a good idea. This is a drawing I did a long time ago. I just never posted it.

Nita Van Zandt said...

I'd love to see a drawing of all your tomato cans in the frame. Now THAT would be mind-blowing!

But a photo would be superlative, too!

shebicycles said...

I love the whole idea ... and I, too, have found myself drawn to tomato cans now that you mention it (altho have never though of collecting them - yet).

Wall Art Pictures said...

Post like this always take you flashback and suddenly some funny moments comes in your mind. I am having smile now.

Thnaks for posting keep following you with some heart touching moments.

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