Jul 13, 2007

Mangia


Our reason for going to Italy again is Yun's love of food. I guess Bologna is the food capital of Italy. That's why we ended up there. Yun has a lot of friends who know about food. They always suggest restaurants to try. One friend knows a chef who owns a restaurant outside of Milan. So we went. It was a lot of really fancy intricate food that was way over my head. I'd be happy to have a quick bowl of spaghetti. The guy, Nicola, turned out to be a great person. He spent a lot of time with us and explained everything. He even sent us to a friend's restaurant in Bologna. the thing that makes Yun crazy is overhearing tourists with food issues. There was a couple next to us from England. The woman was asking if there was gluton in the food? Then she wanted to know if there was wheat, and on and on. Can she have her dressing on the side. LADY, this is Italy. Let down your guard, drop the food requirements and live a little for a week. The waiter just rolled his eyes. In Milan if you order a steak, they say OK and walk away. there is no discussion like in America. "do you want it medium or well done or medium rare. They just cook it one way. The way it supposed to be cooked. Rare. Take it or leave it. If you have a lot of food issues, Italy is not going to be your place. There are plenty of McDonalds and pizza joints around. Try those.

14 comments:

spacedlaw said...

Over here, food is there to be enjoyed and not debated about or fussed over, be it simple or elaborate.

a r n e l said...

Tommy,
on my trips to the USA I discovered there was a difference between fast food and slow food.
Take it from me: there is no such thing as a "speed" for food.
It takes time to prepare food, and you NEED to enjoy your meal (and that takes time too).
All the rest I reheated rubbish.
Have respect for your food, and for the one who cooks.

Tommy Kane said...

True dat.

Sharon said...

Ah Italy! Ah food!! I can think of no better reason (besides art) to visit and explore.

Here's what I blogged about from our trip:

http://e14studio.blogspot.com/2006/03/delizioso.html

Karen at Pen in Hand said...

Not to mis your point about letting down one's guard (and certainly not to detract from the fab sketch, as usual), but it sounds like the gluten-avoiding woman had Celiac disease. It's an inability to process the protein in wheat, and gluten is in damn near everything (including some salad dressings). I know two people who have it. Eating gluten can have them doubled over in pain for hours. It's a real medical problem, not just neuroses.
The Pasta Capital of the World has gotta be a tough place for a Celiac sufferer. Your visit sounds great.

Tommy Kane said...

New york has pretty darn good food too.

m allison r said...

i think anywhere in the US with a strong ethnic community has fantastic food...I have a weakness for good food...depending on the mood, it is better than sex ;)
I wish you would take some photos holding your sketchbook and post those so we can see what your sketchbook looks like "in the round"...

yun said...

Here's a photo of Tom with his sketchbook.... http://www.flickr.com/photos/10092531@N05/1083014491/

what is"in the round" mean?

LitPark said...

The stamps are awesome. So is 40.

Tommy Kane said...

I wish I was 40.

Felicity said...

I have a wheat intolerance, Tommy, so I have to say letting your hair down and enjoying the food is not really possible - well it is but you pay a big price, enough to ruin a holiday! Wheat is in nearly everything but the Italians live on it. It would be really hard to find anything to eat there -either that lady was mad or she maybe had a dream to go there and wasn't going to let anything stop her?

Anyway, more importantly, I love the drawing! Do you combine watercolour and color pencil or just use pencils?

Tommy Kane said...

I only use pencil. You live and learn. thanks for teaching me something new.

Linda said...

Tommy,
I love the color and sense of light in this drawing---the bright and sunny yellow as it contrasts to the shadowy blue-gray of the building it faces. I can feel the sunshine and warmth of the day. I also like the quick, unfinished sketches of the people. It reminds me that while the buildings are static and always there, people pass in the streets all day long. Very nice!

~Linda

Nita said...

I, too, have to avoid gluten, and it turns out that a lot of Italians do too. I found this in Medline:

At least one million EEC citizens are gluten intolerant. In Italy each year 12 million ECU is spent in the diagnosis of uncomplicated gluten intolerance, 10 million ECU for complex diagnosis and 32 million ECU for long-term complications and malignancies.
---
So not even Italians can eat all that great pasta and bread. But the art is always consumable!